Rhythm / ‘to flow’

Definition and etymology

rhythm

/ˈrɪð(ə)m/

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noun
noun: rhythm; plural noun: rhythms
  1. 1.
    a strong, regular repeated pattern of movement or sound.
    “Ruth listened to the rhythm of his breathing”
    synonyms: patternflowtempo, regular features, recurrent nature

    “part of the normal rhythm of daily life”
    • the systematic arrangement of musical sounds, principally according to duration and periodical stress.
      “he made her count beats to the bar and clap the rhythm”
      synonyms: beatcadencetempotimepacepulsethrobliltswing;

      technicalperiodicity
      “the rhythm of the rock music thumped relentlessly”
    • a particular pattern formed by musical rhythm.
      “melodies with deep African rhythms”
    • a person’s natural feeling for musical rhythm.
      “they’ve got no rhythm”
      synonyms: patternflowtempo, regular features, recurrent nature

      “part of the normal rhythm of daily life”
  2. 2.
    the measured flow of words and phrases in verse or prose as determined by the relation of long and short or stressed and unstressed syllables.
    “the rhythm, pattern, and cadence of words”
    synonyms: metremeasurepatternstressaccentpulsetimeflowcadence

    “poetic features such as rhythm, rhyme, and alliteration”
  3. 3.
    a regularly recurring sequence of events or processes.
    “the twice daily rhythms of the tides”
    synonyms: patternflowtempo, regular features, recurrent nature

    “part of the normal rhythm of daily life”
Origin
mid 16th century (also originally in the sense ‘rhyme’): from French rhythme, or via Latin from Greek rhuthmos (related to rhein ‘to flow’).

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